Yudala

Featured post

Enugu done well in infrastructure development – Ugwuanyi

ITRealms : The Executive Governor of Enugu State, Hon. Ifeanyi Ugwuanyi has declared that his administration has done well in infrastru...

GOCOP

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Xenophobic attack: CRADO gives South Africa 40-day ultimatum



The Consumer Rights Advancement Organisation (CRADO) has given the South African government 40 days ultimatum show concrete efforts at stopping lootings and vandalisation of business interests of non-South African blacks, ITRealms reports.

CRADO president, Chief Adeolu Ogunbanjo told correspondent in a press statement that in the last ten years, Xenophobic / Afrophobic attacks, killings, burnings, lootings and vandalisation of business interests of Non-South African Blacks have become a growing concern and common knowledge to some African countries like Somalia, Mozambique, Malawi, Zimbabwe, Ethiopia, Nigeria, Kenya, Zambia and others.   

He noted that in 2006, xenophobic violence broke out for several months in Cape Town, South Africa.

In the month of May, 2008, he said, a series of attacks took place all over South Africa, with gangs of local black South Africans descended on informal settlements and shanty towns armed with clubs, machetes and touches, and attacked immigrants from Mozambique, Malawi and Zimbabwe. 

The locals reportedly accused these immigrants of taking jobs away from them, among other grievances. Over the course of those two weeks, over 60 Non-South African Blacks were killed, several hundreds injured, and many thousands of immigrants were displaced, or returned to their home countries. 

Dealing with the aftermath of the attacks became a large problem for South Africa – prosecuting attackers, accommodating refugees, dealing with a labor shortage, political damage control, sought to address root causes, and some soul-searching all took place.
On May 30, 2013, 25-year-old Abdi Nasir Mahmoud Good, was stoned to death. The violence was captured on a mobile phone and shared on the Internet.

The following month, June, 2013, three Somali shopkeepers were killed and the Somali government requested the South African authorities to do more to protect their nationals. The attacks led to public outcry and worldwide protests by the Somali Diaspora, in Cape Town, London and Minneapolis

On June 7, 2014, a Non-South African Black, in his 50s, was reportedly stoned to death and two others were seriously injured when the angry mob of locals attacked their shop in extension 6 late on Saturday. Three more Non-South African Blacks were wounded from gunshots and shops were looted.

In January 2015, CRADO president pointed out that looters burned businesses owned by Non-South African Blacks in a wave of xenophobic attacks. In addition, there were other incidents of violence last year, according to Human Rights Watch.

Again this year, in April 2015, there was an upsurge in xenophobic / afrophobic attacks throughout South Africa. The attacks started in Durban after Zulu King, Goodwill Zwelithini said at a gathering that foreigners "should pack their bags and go" because they are taking jobs from citizens, local media reported. 

Shortly after his comments, violence against Non-South African Blacks erupted in the port city of Durban. The king’s office has denied he made the comments, saying journalists misquoted him.

Locals looted foreigners' shops and attacked Non-South African Blacks in general, forcing hundreds to relocate to police stations across the country. Some African Governments subsequently began repatriating their nationals, and others also announced that they would evacuate their citizens.              

A Mozambican street vendor Emmanuel Sithole was murdered in Alexandra township as well as the official list of seven victims who were all killed in KwaZulu Natal in the April 2015 attacks.
 

ITREALMS ... everything news digitally!

No comments: